According to the Arizona Coalition, control is domestic abuse. An abuser may have a controlling behavior to maintain dominance over their victim. The controlling behavior, justification of the controlling behavior through belief, and the abuse are the core issues in domestic violence. The control is often pervasive, subtle, and is always close to insidiousness. The controlling may include monitoring the phone calls, limiting their spouse’s freedom of choice such as hairstyle or clothing style, or coming or calling home unexpectedly. 

Similarly, the victim may face physical abuse. This is any physically aggressive behavior that may withhold the physical needs, the threat of any physical violence, or any erratic behavior that is physically harmful. Additionally, a person may face sexual abuse. When the abuser uses sex in an exploitative manner or forces sex on an individual, it may be sexual abuse. Sexual abuse may also include physical and verbal behavior. 

According to Talk Space, they may face economic abuse. It may happen when the abuser attempts or makes their victim financially dependent on them. They may do so by preventing their spouse from gaining an education or working, withholding their access to the economic resources, or controlling their financial support. 

Similarly, they may face psychological abuse. The abused may suffer isolation, threats of harm, or intimidation. They may instill fear on their spouses by their threatening behavior, such as damaging the property or constant supervision. Similarly, they may abuse them spiritually, such as using their spouse’s religious or spiritual beliefs to exert power or manipulate and control them. Furthermore, they may employ emotional abuse. The abuser may undermine their spouse’s sense of self-worth. They may continuously criticize, humiliate, mock, and name-call them.